How to Tell People What You Do

The following insight came from my podcast interview with Ryan Rhoten. I took away a ton in terms of content marketing, website design, sales pitch, and connecting with other people.

There’s a simple formula; problem, solution, success—those three things. Our society has become this where you must have a pitch. But the truth is, you shouldn’t have a standard pitch that you use every single time because it may not apply to the person who’s standing in front of you. So it would be best if you had the flexibility in your pitch to address the person you’re speaking to. 

So if I meet somebody who knows nothing about me, I’m going to say that I help coaches and consultants come up with brand messaging. That’s so clear; everybody knows what I do because most people can grasp that, and they can understand it. And then, they might ask for more details. You can change it up if there are people who know more about you. I wouldn’t say the same thing every time unless I knew the person I was talking to was struggling with one of those things. So it’s about listening to them. Now, if they walk up to you and say, Hey, what do you do, you should have something prepared that says who you are and how your clients benefit. But it doesn’t have to be long. If it’s long, they’re going to stop listening. So the shorter, more succinct you can make it, the better off you are. 

Then that comes back to having a certain level of knowledge. I’m not sure everyone will understand that. So it’s hard to get to really succinct language. But if you remember to start the conversation off with the problem you solve and how people benefit from it, that will help you come up with a pitch that, in general, most people will understand.

It will take you long because we get so wrapped up in our language that we fail to see how our language doesn’t jive with the people we want to speak to and reach. And it’s challenging to close that gap. It takes a lot of thinking, and it just takes a long, long time to get there on your own.

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