Listen to your customer feedback and don’t forget to email

The following insight came from my podcast interview with Scott Kim, where he talked about building a strong core for your business and then improving your products.

I think the infrastructure, for which I think about customer feedback, comes in two big channels. First is the quantitative feedback. And this is the information you get from the users every day, who, by the way, use the product. You’re trying to log everything, trying to figure out what they’re using, what the path or the product is, what parts of the product are liking, and which part of the products are generally ignoring. You get a ton of quantum feedback that way.

Then you have to match that up with qualitative feedback as well. You have to talk to customers. Both customers of your own and customers of other products or adjacent products find out what they like about the products they have. And then you need to weigh those two things together.

Also, you have this third dimension of things that you consider. Often, you don’t know what you want until you see it. To get a great customer or even describe some of the future paths of what they would wish is limited in its thinking. Because they don’t know what kind of data you might have, they don’t know what type of access to other things, that the product might have to dream up a new scenario within the product to be highly used. Often, it will come down to a lot of conversation between you, the consumer, your team, the product team, and the design team trying to think through the different scenarios. There’s not a simple recipe that fits here.

You can test quickly and either fail quickly or succeed quickly, double down on successes, stop the failures quickly. You have to be very intentional about preventing the failures rapidly. That’s the iterative process that we try to go through. But it’s like conversation and then iteration. We try to make that process go as fast as possible to try to get to the roadmap that we think will win long term.

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